Tweets about this Legislation.

Impact of this Legislation HF 1994 and SF 1700: In this Information Age our students need a different preparation.  They need to be well prepared to take on work we still have not yet imagined.  But we do know that the workplace is already moving into a different modality.  Automation and robotics will replace the repetitive task oriented work and even more sophisticated tasks that require multiple steps.  This legislation will prepare our students for the work of the 21st Century. 

Challenges to this Legislation HF 1994 and SF 1700: The State’s Finance Working Group (FWG), was established, in part, to reexamine school finance when faced with the realities of a widely distributed Star Tribune article citing Minnesota’s School districts failures to close the achievement gap and to keep track of $600M yearly distribution to district to address basic skills.  Couple that challenge with our challenge citing school districts failures to keep track of the funding for gifted program, the FWG decided to hold monthly meetings all last year with representatives from across the state and come up with a recommendation.  

Challenges to this Legislation, HF 1994 and SF 1700: One recommendation, which our student advocates are fighting, is the effort by MSBA leadership and their supporters was to remove categorical funding for gifted and shift it into the general fund.  That move would set back gifted education in Minnesota 50 years.  Another maneuver orchestrated by the FWG was to recommend maintaining, “Local Control”.  That was recommended, we believe,  because last April, after a Minnesota House Hearing on the Achievement Gap and the changing demographics in our state, districts were directed by the MDE to start reporting on how their money was being spent.  Someone was finally keeping track.  

Challenges to this Legislation, HF 1994 and SF 1700: What we find ironic is that MSBA has long promoted personalized learning and it is a researched supported approach to learning.  The advanced skills of this legislation, if taught with fidelity, would not only narrow the achievement gap but also personalize learning by tapping students’ strengths while giving them some choice in the pathways they choose for inquiries or problem solving.  

Challenges to this Legislation HF 1994 and SF 1700: We are recommending an accountability system that measure growth in critical and creative thinking.  It is an instrument available in an online format, for which, the MDE could arrange a state wide purchase, and districts would be reporting the growth of thinking directly to the MDE for public awareness. 

The Impact of this legislation on the Social Emotional Needs of Students: Minnesota schools rank poorly in the student-counselor ratio. Yet despite the nearly universal acknowledgment of their importance, Minnesota schools remain severely understaffed, with one counselor for every 792 students. That means Minnesota’s public schools have fewer counselors per student than all but two other states, according to the U.S. Department of Education. The average student-to-counselor ratio nationally is about 450 to 1, while the American School Counselor Association recommends a 250-to-1 ratio.

The Impact of this legislation on the Social Emotional Needs of Students: Minnesota lawmakers have cut state aid to schools by an inflation-adjusted 13 percent since 2003, cutting the number of teachers, administrators, aides and paraprofessionals whose duties now fall to school counselors. With all of these cuts, plus layoffs among school social workers and nurses, counselors are often the school official of last resort helping students deal with problems at home and in school that might lead to dropouts. As a result students’ academic, social and mental health problems are going unattended.

The Impact of this legislation on the Social Emotional Needs of Students: Despite this evidence nearly appointed commissioner of education at the MDE, Heather Mueller, recently suggested that these very professionals who are absent in our schools, would be available to address the social emotional needs of returning students to face to face learning

The Impact of this Legislation on the Social Emotional Needs of Students: In St. Louis, Carlton, Lake and Cook counties, about half of all schools and district buildings don’t have a single counselor, even on a part-time basis – including all nine Duluth elementary schools, Counselors provide services that are not only essential to student well-being, but in their role as career and college counselors they are the bridge between students who might end their education after high school and those who go on to post-secondary education – an important role if we are to produce a workforce that can compete in a technology-driven 21st-century workplace.

 The Impact of this Legislation on the Social Emotional Needs of Students: Bringing counseling into the schools at a level in which all students SEL needs are being met could be one goal of this legislation.  Counselors provide guidance for all students in making good choices, navigating their world, and support to find the right pathway for careers.  Gifted students engaged with proactive counseling would bring gifted students together at grade level to discuss issues important to them and guidance for life choices (MSCA, 2020). 

The Impact of this Legislation on the Social Emotional Needs of Students: Evidence collected by the Pandora group, suggests strong and consistent SEL pays off in student achievement.  More students are showing greater academic gains with SEL experiences than those without SEL experiences. 

The Impact of this Legislation on the Social Emotional Needs of Students: All students benefit from on going learning that recognizes students’ affective needs. It is part of who they are.  We are human beings, who require attention to the cognitive and social emotional needs of each of us.  A steady and developmental approach changes self talk positively.

 The Impact of this Legislation on the Social Emotional Needs of Students:  Imagine over time, students in elementary would learn skills to interact effectively in social settings with age peers.  Middle school students would develop a connection with an adult over a 2 or three-year period, learning to trust that person and seek their insights when confronted with confusion. High school students, in a proactive counseling program would learn about themselves and learn how to negotiate the emerging responsibilities of young adulthood: relationships, college application processes, negotiations with parents with conflicting expectations, etc.

 The Impact of this Legislation on the Social Emotional Needs of Students:  Biblio-therapy, video therapy, music therapy, might address some issues within the proactive groups.  Once groups develop an acceptance of its members with a growing understanding of who they are trust emerges and empathy emerges. Exploring Habits of Mind is another powerful tool to bring into groups. 

The Impact of this Legislation on the Social Emotional Needs of Students:  In proactive groups I conducted I would tell those students, initially, when we meet we will be talking about issues I believe you should know, talk about issues important to you, sometimes talk about issues ripped from headlines or from the school newspaper. But whatever we spoke stayed in the room. Trust emerged.

The Impact of this Legislation on the Social Emotional Needs of Students: Finding students, high school students, began by simply standing outside the office and finding a student I knew and ask him or her to find 5 or 6 other like minds and join me. Later, we would establish a schedule that would not interfere with testing, not be the same hour. And meet once every other week. 

 Innovation Downslide: Although the ramifications of COVID-19 have been swift and indiscriminate, people living in poverty, have been disproportionately impacted by the deadly disease. By some estimates, the economic fallout from the pandemic could push as many as half a billion people into extreme poverty, putting decades of progress in emerging economies at risk. The sad truth is that Minnesota has fallen behind in innovation.

 Innovation Downslide: Minnesota has lost that creative edge, despite pockets of success. Whether ranked by investment in research and development, output of scientific knowledge in peer-reviewed articles, new patents and trademarks, new businesses or venture capital deals, Minnesota is not a top-10 state. By some measures, we’re not even in the top 20. The situation isn’t much better if one adjusts for population size or focuses only on the Twin Cities metro area.

Innovation Downslide: A new study finds that productivity has remained stable or even increased for many companies that shifted to remote work during the coronavirus pandemic. However, innovation has taken a hit as both leaders and employees feel more distant from each other. Videoconferencing and instant messaging apps can’t perfectly replicate the dynamics of being together in the same room, hashing out ideas and feeding off the energy of co-workers. “It’s a challenge to feel connected, confident, and communicate effectively with the team, and we know from a lot of research that creativity and innovation largely happen through collaboration,” says Wharton management professor Michael Parke.

Innovation Downslide: MCCC suggests we need reorient workforce development programs toward the immediate needs of a post-COVID-19 response. For example, demand for IT skills may accelerate both in the short-term – as more businesses shift to digital strategies in light of the pandemic – and in the long-term – as digital technology reshapes existing industries from food production to financial services to retail, and everything in between. Our students need a different education.

 Innovation Downslide: Nationally as well as in Minnesota, various orders shutting down or limiting business operations to ensure social distancing have resulted in layoffs, reduced hours, a surge in Unemployment Insurance (UI) applications and reduced labor force participation. In April 2020, the U.S. unemployment rate surged to 14.5%, up 10.3 percentage points from March, and in Minnesota our official unemployment rate went from 2.9% (seasonally adjusted and revised) for March to 8.7% for April. However, the official unemployment rate may not capture the immediate extent of the downturn Innovation Downslide: If policies to help businesses remain viable and prevent a permanent closure will greatly speed Minnesota’s economic recovery, attention should be directed to better prepare all students for this changing economy. This legislation would result in high school graduates ready to enter the workforce with a background in the skills needed for success in this recovering economy.

Innovation Downslide: Jobless claims continue to remain well above pre-pandemic levels. Thousands of college students will enter the job market in May 2021, making decisions about where to live and start their career. And thousands of small businesses remain at risk of permanent closure. The scale and nature of these challenges require a thoughtful, pragmatic response from every segment of our society, private sector businesses and policymakers.

Innovation Downslide: One starting position would be to change the way we educate or students. We would start seeing a better-prepared workforce a year after implementation of this legislation.Instead of memorizing facts, students would be learning the advanced thinking skills of this legislation. We would start seeing more innovation in the workplace and more entrepreneurship and new businesses launching.

Innovation Downslide: Ninety-eight percent of kindergarteners qualify as creative geniuses. By age 25, only 3% of those adults would quality. Scores decrease steadily over the years, with more significant drops from kindergarten to Grade Three. Even as creativity dips, something problematic in today’s innovation based society, where developing new ideas and finding novel solution are the keys to success (Kim, K. H., 2011)

Innovation Downslide: This legislation, HF 1994 and SF 1700, once implemented would turn this downslide around because all these advanced thinking skills are rich in critical and creative thinking practice. That creativity downslide would disappear.

There exists an accountability element in the legislation.All students would be accessed on their continued growth in critical and creative thinking.  Those advanced skills, along with Inquiry learning and problem-based learning, rich in learning experiences of critical and creative thinking, provide ample opportunity to develop and refine those skills. 

There exists an accountability element in the legislation.  Accountability for HF 1994 and SF 1700, relying on the measurement of growth in critical and creative thinking, could be expedited by a decision of the MDE to make a state wide purchase of the on line test.  The MDE would be able to collect data, monitor districts performances, suggest modifications in a districts’ current practice and report our results to the public.

There exists an accountability element in the legislation.  HF 1994 and SF 1700 will have an element of accountability, relying on the measurement in the growth in critical and creative thinking. That system could be expedited by a decision of the MDE to make a statewide purchase of the on line test.  The MDE would be able to collect data, monitor districts performances, suggest modifications in a districts’ current practice and report our results to the public.

There exists an accountability element in the legislation. HF 1994 and SF 1700 will have an accountability factor. When faced with the suggestion of accountability, and knowing the MDE would be working collaboratively with districts, and knowing funding would follow the expectations, recognizing the intent of the legislation and its impact on narrowing the achievement gap, district leaders have come to understand the importance of this legislation and support this legislation.

There exists an accountability element in the legislation. Accountability is not an oddity for school districts, any funding has most often been link to some form of accountability. What little is expected, with keeping track of growth in critical and creative thinking, district staff can make informed decision

HF 1994 and SF 1700 both address issues of equity, equality and economics. Equity cannot be legislated but equity can be addressed in legislation. HF 1994 and SF 1700 opens opportunity for all students to be taught advanced thinking skills. Those skills were typically only readily available to gifted students engaged in gifted programs.  But evidence reported suggests only 25% of districts have gifted programs.

HF 1994 and SF 1700 both address issues of equity, equality and economics. Equality cannot be legislated but equality can be addressed in legislation. HF 1994 and SF 1700 opens opportunity for more students, especially students of color and disabled students to be identified for gifted programs, by employing universal screening.

HF 1994 and SF 1700 both address issues of equity, equality and economics. Economic changes cannot be legislated, but economics can be addressed in legislation. HF 1994 and SF 1700 addresses economics are provided students with the advanced thinking skills needed to take on more rigorous coursework in high school to prepare for trade school or college. 

 HF 1994 and SF 1700 both address issues of equity, equality and economics.  An accountability system will hold districts responsible for fulfilling the intent of the legislation.  MDE can monitor progress in growing students’ capacity to think creative and critically

Equity, Environment and Education. HF 1994 and SF 1700 both address skills needed to respond to the current and emerging threats to our environment. Change is emerging as the unsettled climate creates challenges for everyone.  The new administration is pushing for positive action to turn around current trends. 

Equity, Environment and Education. HF 1994 and SF 1700, once implemented, will start preparing our students for the eminent change in practices that have fueled our economy for the past 100 years. President Biden convened a virtual meeting of 40 world leaders to discuss addressing climate change

Equity, Environment and Education. HF 1994 and SF 1700, once implemented, will start preparing our students for the eminent change in practices that have fueled our economy for the past 100 years. President Biden convened a virtual meeting of 40 world leaders to discuss addressing climate change.

Equity, Environment and Education. HF 1994 and SF 1700 implemented would better prepare all students for this response to climate change. Business leaders have shifted, as they recognize that climate change is a financial disruptor. Earlier this month, leaders of more than 400 businesses that collectively employ more than 7 million Americans signed a letter asking Biden to cut greenhouse gas emissions by at least 50% below 2005 levels by 2030.

Equity, Environment and Education. HF 1994 and SF 1700: Biden went farther, though, calling for changing the American economy over to renewables, including wind, solar, nuclear, and so on, to make the country carbon-free by 2035. We need a different education in Minnesota.

Equity, Environment and Education. HF 1994 and SF 1700: The Advanced Thinking Skills that all students will master place Minnesota on the frontlines preparing students for that troubling future, impacted by climate change, with the skills to work in innovative workplace jobs as new or evolving companies, who will be responding to this challenge. Employers and employees, in our near future, will be generating a richer and more robust economy for Minnesota.

Equity, Environment and Education. HF 1994 and SF 1700: Universities, Including the U of M, are currently updating department offerings to include a climate curriculum to include, materials degradation of materials, life-cycle analysis, carbon analysis, more sophisticated risk analysis and critical skills for dealing with uncertainty; all tasks in which the advanced thinking skills of this legislation our graduates would had had ample experience.

Equity, Education and the Economy. HF1994 and SF 1700 responds to challenges identified in the MN 2030 Report from the MN Chamber Foundation for Economic Research. The Thursday, following Derek Chauvin’s conviction, 20 year old, Daunte Wright, was shot and killed by police, bringing greater unrest and demands for a systemic change in the education of our students.

Equity, Education and the Economy. HF1994 and SF 1700 responds to challenges identified in the MN 2030 Report from the MN Chamber Foundation for Economic Research. These bills will positively impact the state’s economy. When comparing growth, Minnesota’s economy has been trailing its peers and the U.S. economy the past two decades. GDP and job growth ranked 36th and 45th nationally in 2019.

Equity, Education and the Economy.  HF1994 and SF 1700 responds to challenges identified in the MN 2030 Report from the MN Chamber Foundation for Economic Research. The advanced thinking skills in this legislation would prepare all students for this changing work world which demands for employees to think in complex ways.  Robotics and automation is rapidly replacing repetitive tasks.

 Equity, Education and the Economy.  HF1994 and SF 1700 responds to another challenge identified in the MN Chamber Foundation’s report stating Minnesota’s populations of color grew 32 times faster than the white population and outpaced the U.S. rate last decade. From 2010-2019, Minnesota populations of color grew 32.1 percent, while Minnesota’s white population grew just 1.1 percent. Counties where diverse populations concentrate are typically the counties experiencing population gains in Greater Minnesota.

Equity, Education and the Economy.  HF1994 and SF 1700 responds to another challenge identified in the MN Chamber Foundation’s report stating Minnesota’s populations of color grew 32 times faster than the white population and outpaced the U.S. rate last decade However, despite the economic contributions of diverse Minnesotans and new immigrants, the state continues to see racial and ethnic disparities across a range of social and economic indicators. This remains a top challenge for communities around the state.

Equity, Education and the Economy. HF 1994 and SF 1700 represent a Call for Systemic Change in our students’ education. Inequities exist in our schools.  Access to consistently effective learning can change the change the pathways towards success for all students not just the few.

Equity, Education and the Economy.  HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 responds to the impact of the pandemic that remains.  IHS Markit forecasts that Minnesota’s economy will continue to expand at a modest rate, with GDP averaging 2.2% annual growth through 2030. During that slow economic growth rate, this legislation, once enacted, will set conditions surrounding the education our students with the skills needed to thrive economically.

Equity, Equality, Education and the Economy.  HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. Productivity drives GDP growth, as employment growth slows. With job growth constrained, Minnesota will rely increasingly on productivity to drive economic growth. Innovation and human capital development will only be more important to a growing economy.

 Equity, Equality, Education and the Economy.  HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. Most industries will return to peak employment by 2022. Employment will continue to shift toward technical, medical and service sectors. Six sectors are projected to reach pre-pandemic employment levels in 2021, with most industries returning to peak

Equity, Equality, Education and the Economy.  HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. This legislation, once implemented with fidelity, will impact all four area positively.  Once implements we will begin seeing that impact in the pathways our graduates choose for their future.

Equity, Equality, Education and the Economy.  HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. This legislation, once implemented with fidelity will narrow the achievement gap, better prepare all students for rigorous course work in high school and open the doors to college for many more students of color.

Equity, Environment and Education. HF 1994 and SF 1700 both are needed for the environment of our state. The renewed interest in environmental concerns reflects an understanding of how human life is inextricable from the environment and it should be linked to education.  These bills when passed will better prepare a wide spectrum of our students to pursue advanced education in fields related to environmental education, developing innovative responses to the changing world, and inspire a greater appreciation and value of the natural world.

Equity, Environment and Education. HF 1994 and SF 1700 both address skills needed to respond to the current and emerging threats to our environment. Change is emerging as the unsettled climate creates challenges for everyone.  The new administration is pushing for positive action to turn around current trends. 

Equity, Environment and Education. HF 1994 and SF 1700, once implemented, will start preparing our students for the eminent change in practices that have fueled our economy for the past 100 years. President Biden convened a virtual meeting of 40 world leaders to discuss addressing climate change.

Equity, Environment and Education. HF 1994 and SF 1700, once implemented, will start preparing our students for the eminent change in practices that have fueled our economy for the past 100 years. President Biden convened a virtual meeting of 40 world leaders to discuss addressing climate change.

Equity, Environment and Education. HF 1994 and SF 1700 implemented would better prepare all students for this response to climate change. Business leaders have shifted, as they recognize that climate change is a financial disruptor. Earlier this month, leaders of more than 400 businesses that collectively employ more than 7 million Americans signed a letter asking Biden to cut greenhouse gas emissions by at least 50% below 2005 levels by 2030.

Equity, Environment and Education. HF 1994 and SF 1700: Biden went farther, though, calling for changing the American economy over to renewables, including wind, solar, nuclear, and so on, to make the country carbon-free by 2035. We need a different education in Minnesota.

Equity, Environment and Education. HF 1994 and SF 1700: The Advanced Thinking Skills that all students will master place Minnesota on the frontlines preparing students for that troubling future, impacted by climate change, with the skills to work in innovative workplace jobs as new or evolving companies, who will be responding to this challenge. Employers and employees, in our near future, will be generating a richer and more robust economy for Minnesota.

Equity, Environment and Education. HF 1994 and SF 1700: Universities, Including the U of M, are currently updating department offerings to include a climate curriculum to include, materials degradation of materials, life-cycle analysis, carbon analysis, more sophisticated risk analysis and critical skills for dealing with uncertainty; all tasks in which the advanced thinking skills of this legislation our graduates would had had ample experience.

Equity, Education and the Economy. HF1994 and SF 1700 responds to challenges identified in the MN 2030 Report from the MN Chamber Foundation for Economic Research. The Thursday, following Derek Chauvin’s conviction, 20 year old, Daunte Wright, was shot and killed by police, bringing greater unrest and demands for a systemic change in the education of our students.

Equity, Education and the Economy. HF1994 and SF 1700 responds to challenges identified in the MN 2030 Report from the MN Chamber Foundation for Economic Research. These bills will positively impact the state’s economy. When comparing growth, Minnesota’s economy has been trailing its peers and the U.S. economy the past two decades. GDP and job growth ranked 36th and 45th nationally in 2019.

Equity, Education and the Economy. HF1994 and SF 1700 responds to challenges identified in the MN 2030 Report from the MN Chamber Foundation for Economic Research. The advanced thinking skills in this legislation would prepare all students for this changing work world which demands for employees to think in complex ways. Robotics and automation is rapidly replacing repetitive tasks.

Equity, Education and the Economy. HF1994 and SF 1700 responds to another challenge identified in the MN Chamber Foundation’s report stating Minnesota’s populations of color grew 32 times faster than the white population and outpaced the U.S. rate last decade. From 2010-2019, Minnesota populations of color grew 32.1 percent, while Minnesota’s white population grew just 1.1 percent. Counties where diverse populations concentrate are typically the counties experiencing population gains in Greater Minnesota.

Equity, Education and the Economy. HF1994 and SF 1700 responds to another challenge identified in the MN Chamber Foundation’s report stating Minnesota’s populations of color grew 32 times faster than the white population and outpaced the U.S. rate last decade However, despite the economic contributions of diverse Minnesotans and new immigrants, the state continues to see racial and ethnic disparities across a range of social and economic indicators. This remains a top challenge for communities around the state.

Equity, Education and the Economy. HF 1994 and SF 1700 represent a Call for Systemic Change in our students’ education. Inequities exist in our schools. Access to consistently effective learning can change the change the pathways towards success for all students not just the few.

Equity, Education and the Economy. HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 responds to the impact of the pandemic that remains. IHS Markit forecasts that Minnesota’s economy will continue to expand at a modest rate, with GDP averaging 2.2% annual growth through 2030. During that slow economic growth rate, this legislation, once enacted, will set conditions surrounding the education our students with the skills needed to thrive economically.

Equity, Equality, Education and the Economy. HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. Productivity drives GDP growth, as employment growth slows. With job growth constrained, Minnesota will rely increasingly on productivity to drive economic growth. Innovation and human capital development will only be more important to a growing economy.

Equity, Equality, Education and the Economy. HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. Most industries will return to peak employment by 2022. Employment will continue to shift toward technical, medical and service sectors. Six sectors are projected to reach pre-pandemic employment levels in 2021, with most industries returning to peak

Equity, Equality, Education and the Economy. HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. This legislation, once implemented with fidelity, will impact all four area positively. Once implements we will begin seeing that impact in the pathways our graduates choose for their future.

Equity, Equality, Education and the Economy. HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. This legislation, once implemented with fidelity will narrow the achievement gap, better prepare all students for rigorous course work in high school and open the doors to college for many more students of color.

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530.   IL and PBL, when taught with fidelity, include both strength based learning strategies and choice in learning.  Both motivate students to learn and engage them in learning. Those experiences are student centered and personalize learning. 

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. This legislation personalizes learning, narrows the achievement gap, moves Minnesota towards a World Class education system, offers a solution to the economic challenges Minnesota is facing, prepares students for the changing world. 

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. Who would oppose this legislation? There are some legislators not willing to grasp the impact of the research that supports this legislation. There are some MSBA members not willing to understand the research supporting this legislation.

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. While not all legislators on the education committees are former teachers or researchers, there still exists an obligation for these legislators to understand the research that supports teaching these advanced thinking skills of the legislation.

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. Why would the MDE be opposed to this legislation when as most are educators know the research that supports the legislation and know how its impact on the Achievement Gap. We could see most of our students succeeding.

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. A year ago this past spring, in a hearing in the MN House, experts testified about the challenges facing Minnesota, the changing demographics, the stubborn achievement gap and an opportunity for a constitutional change in how we educate our students. Out of that meeting the legislature directed the MDE to start keeping track of funding, asking districts to report how their state aid was being spent.

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. Out of that meeting the legislature directed the MDE to start keeping track of funding, asking districts to report how their state aid was being spent.

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. It appears the legislature had read the Star Tribune’s investigative report providing evidence of a $600M, multi-year failure to report on how that money was spent or it’s impact. So the new rule stirred the districts.

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530.  So MSBA and MASA, long time supporters of, “local control”, determined that losing that option did not align with their goals, so they worked with MDE to create the “School Finance Working Group”. 

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. After a year of on line meetings they concluded with recommendations for removing categorical funding for gifted programming and maintaining local control.

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. Despite having met with us, and having been provided all the literature and research that supports our arguments, MASA and MDE have stood against this legislative initiative. Yet MASA had no argument with us.

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530.  Yet, when we meet face to face with superintendents, their response is one of, “Is it funded?” We responded with an affirmative and they have agreed.  When we laid out our argument is a brief radio interview, the superintendent, who had in his possession documents summarizing research supporting the HF 1994 and SF 1700 and the clones, he agreed with our legislative proposal.

Opposition to this legislation HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. When we approached both MSBA and EDMN, neither lobbyist was interested in knowing about the research that supports our argument in HF 1994 and SF 1700 and its clones, they are simply worried about the $.If that was their only concern, we know now know it is not the money because the current Education Omnibus bill for 2021-2022 is an improvement over the last years.

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. No matter who we address, no matter what we offer, our challengers cannot find fault with the research that guides our efforts. MSBA and their supporters just do not want to be told what to do nor to be held accountable. In systemic change those tired and obstructionist behaviors are behind us now as we move forward into the 21st Century.  It is in our collective, enlightened self-interest to embrace this legislation.

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. Please remember the implementation plan. In the first year, districts receive half of the increased funding for gifted programming. With those dollars districts can examine what they are doing well that fits with this systemic change and prepare their staff to teach all students those advanced skills. 

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530.In the second year of funding, $39 PPU goes to schools. In that second year and every year there after, the funding remains the same until we find it is insufficient. Because it could be three years until we begin seeing the full benefits, district wide, of this systemic change, funding needs to be monitored and assessed to determine its benefits.

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. There exists an accountability element in the legislation: Texas with its 5.5M students have an accountability system and recently invoked a new expectation, requiring all districts to give up it “Local Control”, in part because districts were not spending the gifted dollars as intended.

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. This legislation would challenge current practice of “Local Control”. Districts would be expected to fund gifted programs, fund defensible identification and provide the ongoing professional development focused on all teachers to prepare them to effectively teach teachers these advanced thinking skills and expect them to build them into their teaching.

Impact of this Legislation Impacting the Teaching Gifted Students Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530.All teachers will be impacted. But accommodations in the implementation will be in place. In the first year of implementation with funding at the $26PPU, teachers will be provided professional development opportunities focused on the nature and needs of gifted students, addressing both the cognitive and affective of these students.

Impact of this Legislation Impacting the Teaching Gifted Students. That PD will include practice with the advanced thinking skills of this initiative. Teachers will be expected to enhance their teaching and learning to include those advanced skills in all disciplines.

Impacting the Teaching Gifted Students Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530.All teachers will be impacted. But accommodations in the implementation will be in place. In the first year of implementation with funding at the $26PPU, teachers will be provided professional development opportunities focused on the nature and needs of gifted students, addressing both the cognitive and affective of these students.

Impacting the Teaching Gifted Students Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. That PD will include practice with the advanced thinking skills of this initiative. Teachers will be expected to enhance their teaching and learning to include those advanced skills in all disciplines.

Impacting the Teaching Gifted Students Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 Impact of this Legislation on Those Professionals Who Work Most Closely With All Students.While this legislation will impact all students, including the gifted, those professionals working most closely will have different responsibilities in response to the rule

Impacting the Teaching Gifted Students Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. Teachers of the gifted have been studied. Participants included 63 teachers and 1,247 highly able students. The majority of teachers reported holding advanced degrees in a content area; most were not certified to teach and reported completing no formal coursework in gifted education.

Impacting the Teaching Gifted Students Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. Impacting the Teaching Gifted Students Results from the MBTI indicated that exemplary teachers were more likely to prefer N (intuition) and T (thinking), as compared to a normative teacher sample. Results suggest that teacher personality and cognitive style may play a role in his or her effectiveness in teaching gifted students.

Impact of this Legislation: Impacting the Teaching Gifted Students Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. The personality types of teachers were in many ways similar to the personality types of the gifted students. These findings suggest that teachers who are judged to be highly effective in working with gifted students prefer abstract themes and concepts, are open and flexible, and value logical analysis and objectivity.

Impacting the Teaching: Gifted Students Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. Impacting the Teaching of Gifted Students. Teachers in the regular classroom will need practice in differentiating the content, the processes, and products they ask students to engage in learning.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700 and its clones begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota.The 2020 census reports people of color are making up a greater share of populations in every county in the state, partly due to births and migration, but also because of a declining white non-Hispanic population. For example, people of color now make up about 5% of the population in Lincoln County in southwestern Minnesota, up from 2% at the last census. A closer look shows that the county has about 125 more people of color than it did in 2010 and 380 fewer people who identify as white non-Hispanic.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700and its clones begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota. In the seven-county metro area, the under-18 population is closing in on becoming “majority minority.” About 46% of that group identify as either Hispanic or a race other than white. That’s also significantly higher than the adult population, which is at 27% nonwhite. Young school age people in the rest of Minnesota are also more likely to be people of color than the adults around them, but the rates are much lower.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700 and its clones, Equity, Equality, once implemented, begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota. The 2020 census reports people of color are making up a greater share of populations in every county in the state, partly due to births and migration, but also because of a declining white non-Hispanic population. For example, people of color now make up about 5% of the population in Lincoln County in southwestern Minnesota, up from 2% at the last census. A closer look shows that the county has about 125 more people of color than it did in 2010 and 380 fewer people who identify as white non-Hispanic begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota. Across the nation the growth stagnation of the nation’s youth population would be even more severe were it not for the contributions of people of color. Because immigrants and their U.S.-born children, together, are younger than the rest of the population, recent decades’ immigration from Latin America, Asia, and elsewhere served to bolster the size of the nation’s youth population. This is evident in the contributions of different race-ethnic groups over the 2010-to-2020 period, which shows that Latino or Hispanic youth, Asian American youth, and youth identifying with two are more races contributed to all of this age group’s population gains.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700 and its clones, begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota. In Minnesota, almost half of our labor force growth in the past decade came from immigrants, which means the new workers of today look a lot different from a generation ago. Yet in many cases, we have struggled to train and integrate immigrants effectively into our economy, leading to pervasive income gaps that stifle growth. That has to change. According to the Star Tribune, (16/2021), This inequality, between racial groups and between the rich and poor, has been simmering for a long time in America. Economists show that we’ve experienced the greatest increase in income inequality of any rich nation in the past several decades. According to the Economic Policy Institute, from 1978 to 2018 CEO compensation grew 940% adjusted for inflation, but just 12% for the typical worker.

 

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and its clones begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota. Working people simply don’t get paid enough to support their families. In fact, 80% of the open jobs in Minnesota today pay less than the average state wage, and 37% of them pay under $15 an hour. Combine that with fears over in-person work due to the pandemic and major shortages in child care, and is it any wonder that job-seekers are being a bit picky about what they do next?

 

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700 and its clones begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota. If Minnesota is going to address our labor shortage in a meaningful way, we need to be aggressive in adapting to these dynamics. If Minnesota is going to address our labor shortage in a meaningful way, we need to be aggressive in adapting to these dynamics. First, we have to make our economy work for today’s worker. That means employers need to rethink their compensation and benefits packages, and their hiring strategies. Since Minnesota-based Punch Pizza announced a $15 hourly wage in April, CEO John Puckett told me he has seen applications for hourly positions jump 500%. Red Wing Shoes’ innovative new “Hyflex” program allows workers to choose any four-hour block they are available to work during the week, based on their schedules. And Jennie-O Turkey Store pooled investments with other organizations to build a child-care center for workers in Spicer.

 

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700 and its clones begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota. Of course, telling a small business with thin profit margins to raise wages or increase benefits is hard. But most employers will tell you they have no choice, and the market is already absorbing some of the higher prices that can come with it. Government needs to help. The Department of Employment and Economic Development’s (DEED) Good Jobs Now campaign calls job seekers every week, pointing out open jobs with good wages and benefits along with training opportunities. This legislation will prepare all students for these higher paying jobs.

 

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700 and its clones begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota. Second, to address our labor shortage Minnesota must invest more in automation. Not only does automation increase productivity, but it also provides opportunity for higher skilled positions that pay more. Automation accelerated during the pandemic. Orders for robots in North America increased 20% in the first three months of 2021, according to the Association for Advancing Automation. This legislation, with the next four years will produce high school graduates with a much different preparation

 

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700and its clones begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota. Some districts are already faced with dramatic changes in the student population. Worthington Public School, with second generation Hispanic or Latino now in their schools, the district’s population continues to change, with over 59% of the student population, Hispanic or Latino and 6.8% black or African-American, while 21% of the students are white. They are not alone.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700 and its clones begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota. St. Paul, with its influx of Asian, Latino and Black or African-American representing almost 86% of their student population, represents a similar challenge. Education and economics are closely related and as this population graduates they will become contributing participants in the state’s economic with higher paying jobs.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 begins to immediately transforms teaching and learning that is personalized, student centered, competency based, learning does not just take place in schools and students take ownership of their learning. Students will be engaged and motivated to learning when teachers as facilitators, tap students strengths and provide choice in learning.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 addresses both creative and critical thinking skills. Taught independently or within PBL or Inquiry Learning, students will be practicing those important advanced thinking skills and there is a positive impact on academic achievement.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 addresses the teaching of creative thinking strategies throughout a student’s experiences in school. Research, a meta-analysis of 120 studies (total N = 52,578; 782 effects) examining the relationship between creativity and academic achievement in research conducted since the 1960s. Average correlation between creativity and academic achievement was r = .22, 95%. In another study, researchers investigated relationship between students’ creativity and academic achievement. The sample size of 72 subjects was conducted to collect data from the student questionnaire and Torrence’s creativity were used. Field of information gleaned from questionnaires and were analyzed by using both descriptive and inferential statistics. These results are captured components of creativity and achievement, and there were positive significant relationships. The Relationship Between Creativity And Academic Achievement Yaghoob Namia, Hossein Marsooli b, Maral Ashouri.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 begins to immediately transforms teaching and learning that is personalized. Students engaged in Inquiry Learning and Problem based learning will have ample experience employing critical and creative thinking strategies, while often working collaboratively with their fellow students.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota. Minneapolis public school is experiencing a different balance of demographics in their school.With 55% of their student population, students of color, face similar challenges. Yet this legislation’s advanced thinking skills will prepare all 33,000 students for the changing work world and set them on a pathway to college or trade schools.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota. Anoka-Hennepin Public schools with its 38,000 students face a different challenge with 62% of their population are white students. These students will all be challenged and engaged in the learning when all teachers are teaching the Advanced Thinking Skills of this legislation.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota. In that response teacher/facilitators will be introducing these new skills signaling a change in the teaching and learning going on in those classrooms. Will all students embrace this innovative approach initially. Like all new learning some students will thrive and surpass your expectations. Some students, like learning to ride a bike, will need multiple attempts to master this innovate approach.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 addresses the needs of all students, K-12, including the gifted. Scholars agree there are challenges to including all students in the identification practices for screening culturally and linguistically diverse students, disabled students, students of color and those from lower Income households for gifted programming. There is an element of this legislation that expects school districts to include Universal Screening as that inclusive practice. It goes beyond the traditional IQ test and looks at other ways to identify talent.  Consider a portfolio of student work, snapshots of performances, products created by students, all provide a clearer picture of student potential.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 addresses the needs of all students, K-12, including the gifted. Universal screening does open doors for many students often overlooked.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 addresses the advanced thinking skills of this legislation. Inquiry Learning, a learning skill that addresses complexity and depth in learning can be taught to all students.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 provides kindergarten teachers opportunities to introduce inquiry learning to their students and provide the guidance the initial guidance needed to successfully pursue the question, “What happened on the day I was born?” Those 5 year olds would be learning about themselves, their family members and get their first understanding of expert voices that are needed for an inquiry.  

 

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 opens opportunities for teacher facilitators to engage kindergarten students in rich learning. Maria Montessori, once said, “The goal of early childhood education should be to activate the child’s natural desire to learn.” A kindergartener is on a constance journey to understand their world.  That natural curiosity can be nurtured and satisfied through inquiry learning.

 

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 opens opportunities for all students to find success in learning. The Advanced Thinking Skills of this legislation, when taught with fidelity, will narrow the achievement gap. Research, grounded in Effect Size studies (ES), coupled with a meta-analysis provides evidence of academic growth on achievement measures. An ES greater than .1 suggests 0.2 – 0.4 is a small but educationally significant impact, 0.4 – 0.6 is a medium educationally significant impact and greater than 0.6 is large.

 

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 opens opportunities for all students to find success in learning. Teacher/Facilitators in a classroom rich in inquiry experiences listen to students, seek out their student’s strengths and serve as a guide for the student.

 

The Advanced Thinking Skills of this legislation, HF 1994 and SF 1700 SF 2523, SF 2530 2408, include Inquiry Learning Strategies. When used in place of a textbook approach, an inquiry-based approach yielded significantly higher achievement for high school students with special needs. Twenty-six junior high school students with learning disabilities studied two science units via an activity-based, inquiry-oriented approach or a textbook approach. Pre- and post-tests revealed that when students were taught by experiential, more indirect methods, they learned more and remembered more than they were taught by more direct instructional methods. When inquirers present their findings to a student audience all students in the classroom are learning.

The Advanced Thinking Skills of this legislation, HF 1994 and SF 1700 SF 2523, SF 2530 2408, include Inquiry Learning Strategies. The research also revealed that hands-on science activities were greatly favored over textbook activities by students who had experienced both.

The Advanced Thinking Skills of this legislation, HF 1994 and SF 1700 SF 2523, SF 2530 2408, include Inquiry Learning Strategies Students were asked about their impressions of the two instructional methods. 96% reported that they enjoyed the inquiry approach more, and over 80% considered the activities more facilitative of learning and more motivating. Scruggs, T. E. and M.A. Mastropieri. 1993. Reading versus doing: The relative effects of textbook based and inquiry-oriented approaches to science learning in special education classrooms. Journal of Special Education 27 (1): 1-15.

The Advanced Thinking Skills of this legislation, HF 1994 and SF 1700 SF 2523, SF 2530 2408, impact student achievement. An inquiry-based curriculum can increase student achievement and narrow the gap between high- and low-achieving students. Middle school teachers who used an inquiry approach increased the achievement scores of African American students, narrowed the achievement gap between male and female students, and found that their students were more interested in what they had to teach. Kahle, J. B., J. Meece, and K. Scantlebury. 2000. Urban African-American middle school science students: Does standards-based teaching make a difference? Journal of Research in Science Teaching 37 (9):1019-1041.

The Advanced Thinking Skills of this legislation, HF 1994 and SF 1700 SF 2523, SF 2530 2408, impact student achievement.Problem Based Learning (PBL), closely related to Inquiry Learning, provides another pathway in learning that engages students and taps their strengths.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 provides teachers opportunities to support PBL with their students.  Problems identified in the community through their high school coursework.  Social issues, Infrastructure challenges, housing, healthcare, peer relationship issues, political issues could all be explored through PBL.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 provides teachers opportunities to support PBL with their students. American businesses need an educated workforce to successfully fill 21st-century STEM jobs, yet 38% of CEOs say at least half of their entry-level applicants lack basic STEM skills. As educators, we must prepare our students for the jobs of the future. We need to ensure that students have the knowledge and skills they need to succeed. Project-based learning (PBL) supports 21st-century student-learning outcomes. Research shows that students who learn through PBL are often more engaged in the learning process and develop a deeper understanding of the content and skills required for college, work, and life beyond school.. Preparing Today’s Students for the Jobs ofTomorrow. Education Week Spotlight, 2018.

 Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 provides teachers opportunities to support PBL with their students In a meta-analysis of 82 observational studies comparing PBL to other instructional approaches, Walker and Leary (2009) found PBL was most strongly associated with student gains in strategic thinking and designing solutions to complex challenges. A synthesis of eight meta-studies of observational studies from the past four decades showed transmission instructional approaches lagged behind PBL in the areas of students’ long-term retention and skill development, as well as satisfaction among both teachers and students. Transmission approaches were, on average, more effective for short-term retention, as measured through standardized exams (Strobel and van Barneveld, 2009). However, causal conclusions are difficult to draw from observational studies because teachers who choose to teach using a PBL approach may differ from those who do not—and those differences, rather than the PBL approach, may drive observed associations between students’ exposure to PBL and their outcomes.

Equity, Equality, and Economics. Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 provides teachers opportunities to support PBL with their students. PBL can be conducted as group investigations or individual efforts.  Partners working together also draw students into the learning.

Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 provides teachers opportunities to support PBL with their students.PBL is both collaborative and engaging for students as the teacher facilitator guides the learning.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 begins to respond to impending challenges will face technology The technology, media and telecom industry, which the United States currently leads, could lose out on $162 billion in unrealized output by 2030 due to sector skills shortages. As the researchers put it, “These talent deficits may imperil America’s status as the global tech center.”

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 begins to respond to impending challenges facing not only Minnesota but the nation. “In the United States, according to the report, the skills deficit will be come to the forefront by 2020 and become “significant” by the year 2030. The financial and business services sector, which makes up a disproportionate amount of the American economy, will suffer the worst by then, experiencing a talent shortage expected to exceed 1.2 million workers and generating a shortfall of an estimated $436 billion.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 begins to respond to impending challenges facing not only Minnesota but the nation. “Our study reveals that there already isn’t enough skilled talent to go around, and, by 2030, organizations and economies could find themselves in the grip of a talent crisis. In the face of such acute talent shortages, workforce planning and a comprehensive understanding of the talent pipeline are critical,” said Korn Ferry CEO, Alan Guarino, in a prepared statement. “The acute demand for workers with the right skills that businesses need, rather than the much-discussed domination of technology in business, could become the defining issue of our age.” This legislation is a solution to this challenge.

Equity, Equality and the Economics of Health Care, HF 1994, SR 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530, will all impact Minnesota’s Healthcare Challenges. JAMA, reports it has published more than 850 articles on racial and ethnic disparities and inequities. The new issue offers studies on disparities in the utilization of health care services and in overall health spending. Together, the findings paint a portrait of a nation still plagued by medical haves and have-nots whose ability to benefit from scientific advances varies by race and ethnicity, despite the fact that the ACA greatly expanded insurance. Minnesota is no different.

Equity, Equality and the Economics of Health Care, HF 1994, SR 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530, will all impact Minnesota’s Healthcare Challenges. JAMA goes on “… we call for investments to create “communities of opportunity”. We use this term to describe the transformation of local communities (that had been historically disadvantaged because of racism and its related systematic under-investments), into places that provide opportunities in education, labor markets, housing markets, credit markets, health care and all other domains that drive well-being. We view the underlying existing inequities as products of racism and the creation of communities of opportunity as a systematic, comprehensive and coordinated national initiative to eliminate the racism that is embedded in policies, procedures and the routine operation of many societal institutions. Improving health of disadvantaged groups and reducing gaps in health requires changing systems to improve conditions that determine health in homes, schools, neighborhoods, workplaces, houses of worship and other social contexts.” A call for systemic change in the way we educate our students by teaching them the advanced thinking skills of this legislation will pay off in dividends.

Equity, Equality and the Economics of Health Care, HF 1994, SR 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530, will all impact Minnesota’s Healthcare Challenges. While numerous statistics point to a stark achievement gap (arguably fueled by an opportunity gap), Senior Director, AAMC Dr. Norma Poll-Hunter rejects the notion that the students are somehow less able. “It’s not the students that are the problem – not the young Black boys or young men. It’s the system and how the system treats them along the way.” Indeed, Dr. Nivet also cites George W. Bush’s phrase “the soft bigotry of low expectations” as a major factor that starts as early as kindergarten and continues through their academic career. Dr. Poll-Hunter adds “The systemic issues build on each other over time and create a disadvantage that even the best students can’t overcome because the reality is that the system has embedded within it these biases that often determine what talent looks like and where talent should come from.” This legislation begins to impact students, K-12, from the first year of implementation.

Equity, Equality and the Economics of Health Care, HF 1994, SR 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530, will all impact Minnesota’s Healthcare Challenges. One challenge, the near absence of Black Male Doctor has been addressed by the AMA.“While the numbers for African Americans are dismal overall, for Black men they’re particularly tragic. Indeed, AAMC’s data shows that the percentage enrollment for African American women actually increased from only 2.2% during the 1978-79 school year to 4.4% during the 2019-20 school year (5.2% when considering those identifying as Black and another race). This begs the question – over the past forty+ years, why haven’t the numbers gotten significantly better for Black men?”

Equity, Equality and the Economics of Health Care, HF 1994, SR 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530, will all impact Minnesota’s Healthcare Challenges. While some may push back on the concept of systemic racism – instead preferring to see inequities as one off aberrations or a result of individual failings – the dearth of Black male doctors in America is arguably a great example of the predictable results of systemic, widespread racism. Arguably, the specific root cause factors are many – all tinged by the reality of racism’s grip on many facets of society including inequities in education, household income, the judicial system, community resources, and many other factors.This legislation with its focus on preparing all students, regardless of color, with the advanced thinking skills needed in our collective future in Minnesota.

Equity, Equality and the Economics is addressed in this legislation.HF 1994, SR 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530, will all impact Minnesota’s students differently.This legislation is call for systemic change in the way we educate our students.  The current model of teaching and learning places the teacher at its center.  In the model emerging from this legislation places the students at the center of learning.  Sir Robertson suggests that this is a paradigm shift. Label It systemic change or paradigm shift, our students will be engaged differently. 

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. When faced with the rationale included in this legislation and providing evidence of personalized learning, as supported by MSBA, and recognizing that the advanced skills of this legislation would narrow the achievement, you would expect the leadership of MSBA to embrace the legislation. 

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. Instead, MSBA decided to pursue an effort to cancel any attempts at a Mandate.  It was also a failure in not recognizing this legislative initiative is a Call for Systemic Change in the teaching and learning that takes place in our schools.  

224. Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530, this legislation once implemented provides expectations that all students would be taught the advanced thinking skills, supporting the MSBA and MASA long term initiative for personalizing learning

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 offers solution to the challenge of closing the achievement gap and brings Personalized Learning to all classrooms in the state. Yet, despite receiving a 2.4% increase in the first year and an additional 2% in the second year, district leadership and MSBA leaders celebrated the wiping out of any accountability through mandates, effectively announcing that they did not want district to be accountable for how those dollars were to be spent.  It appears some agency should be watching.  They do have a poor track record from the recent past. 

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 an alternative to that opposition. Equity in education has two dimensions. The first is fairness, which basically means making sure that personal and social circumstances – for example school district location, gender, socio-economic status or ethnic origin – should not be an obstacle to achieving educational potential. This legislation addresses equity. 

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 an alternative to that opposition. Education plays an important role in determining how you spend your adult life – a higher level of education means higher earnings, better health, and a longer life. By the same token, the long-term social and financial costs of educational failure are high. So an equitable and inclusive educational system that makes the advantages of education available to all is one of the most powerful levers to make Minnesota schools more equitable.

Fifty-years after the Marland Act, private enterprise has taken the lead in space exploration.  That initial interest and funding established gifted education in Minnesota and our narrowly selected group students were provided a different education in gifted programs that were launched in the 1970’s. We were preparing students to go into their careers prepared to assist in the rapidly changing workplace. With our rapidly changing demographics in Minnesota and the accelerated change in the workplace in our near future, our current students need a different preparation.  The Advanced thinking skills of this legislation will provide that needed training. 

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 offers solution to the challenge of the inequities that exist in healthcare, social services, in access to quality and challenging education, in home owning and the ability to pass on wealth to generations that follow. This legislation addresses the environmental challenges facing Minnesota by producing an educated population prepared with advanced thinking skills to reason out current and future challenges to the air, water and land we all share.  

 Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 offers solution to the challenge of the inequities that exist in our schools.  It would result in eliminating the opportunity gap and promoting success from birth to career pathways enhanced by the mastery of the Advanced Thinking Skills. 

 Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 offers solution to the challenge The basic structure of education systems affects equity. Traditionally, education systems have sorted students according to attainment. Evidence from studies of secondary and primary schools suggests that such sorting can increase inequalities and inequities, particularly if it takes place early in the education process. This legislation, once implemented would open opportunities early for K-12 students to experience practicing the Advanced Thinking Skills, including IL and PBL. 

 Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 offers solution to the challenge. The socio-economic structure of Minnesota’s education teaching and learning is also important. Secondary school systems where there are large socio-economic differences between schools tend to not equalize educational opportunities for all students and where you live impacts your opportunity to learn.

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 offers solution to the challenge: In a recent report from NWEA research suggests on average, “students across most grades (3-8) made reading and math gains in 2020-21. However, students’ outcomes during the pandemic-affected school year were lower on multiple dimensions: Students made gains during the 2020-21 school year at a lower rate compared to pre- pandemic trends, especially between winter and spring. Students ended the year with lower achievement compared to a typical year, with larger declines relative to historical trends in math (8 to 12 percentile points) than in reading (3 to 6 percentile points). Achievement was lower for all student groups in 2020-21; however American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN), Black, and Latinx students, as well as students in high-poverty schools were disproportionately impacted, particularly in the elementary grades we studied”. Remember in the initial year of implementation, districts will receive half ($26 PPU) of the funding increase to prepare for full implementation ($39 PPU) in the following year.  Professional development will be part of that preparation.  

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 offers solution to the challenge. Inquiry Learning and Problem based learning, rich in practice with critical thinking and creative thinking skills are student centered learning.  The teacher/facilitator is the master of standards.  The learning is student centered.  Students practicing their inquiry and problem based learning experiences, are reading more content. In their presentations the student audience is learning more and reading more.  Teacher/facilitators are recording standards met on the students’ journeys. Payoff is growth in academic achievement for all students. 

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 offers solution to the challenge from those unhappy with the label, Gifted.  The term, Gifted, is a social construct that gains meaning in context.  When NAGC voices its opinion, they reference the term. When Minnesota embrace the funding and programming that began gifted education in the state, Gifted, was employed. School district had Gifted and Talented programs in those initial years, while some districts opted the High Potential Program.  Thinking that language would meet less resistance.  Emerging scholars in the late 70’s a tested the waters with labels that more clearly identified specific areas of giftedness, mathematically gifted, artistically gifted, linguistically gifted, spatially gifted, musically gifted.  It appeared to be more appropriate. Later Gifted Services emerged across that state as an accepted label for programming. It was more inclusive in nature and that label spread.  Later, as Gifted Programs began disappearing across the metro area, as well as, greater Minnesota, a few districts opted for the Talent Development Model that for many gifted students it was no programming at all.  Many districts simply chose to have no gifted program, at all.  

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 positively responds to the call from the National School Boards Association report on equity (2106). “Public schools should provide equitable access and ensure that all students have the knowledge and skills to succeed as contributing members of a rapidly changing global society regardless of race, gender, sexual orientation, ethnic background, English proficiency, immigration status, socioeconomic status, or disability.” 

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 positively responds to the changing demographics in our state. This legislation includes an expectation to employ Universal Screening as an identification process that tends to be more inclusive identifying more students of color and disabled students.

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 positively responds to the changing demographics in our state. This legislation includes an expectation to employ Universal Screening as an identification process that tends to be more inclusive identifying more students of color and disabled students.

Inclusive programming for gifted programs would include students of color. The challenge identified in this video points to a common challenge faced by most districts regarding of the lack of Black Male Teachers. Hopefully that condition will change as more efforts by media and state agencies to recruit more adult Black Males to the ranks of teachers in all schools. Universal Screening will be enhanced when identification practices include Black Male teachers. Universal screening with its many tools will become common practice in our schools.

Opposition to this Legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 positively responds to the Differences Encountered In the Classroom and in Gifted Programs. Gifted Students with Disabilities, (2E), are often missed in the identification process in gifted programs. A 2E student’s performance is often masked by the disability. Universal Screening, included in the legislation would be employed and more disabled students would start benefitting from the gifted programs.

Opposition to this Legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 positively responds to the Differences Encountered in the Classroom and in Gifted Programs. One common description of gifted students is their intensity. That intensity may mask the gift that students brings to the classroom that would allow that student to soar academically.

Opposition to this Legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 positively responds to the Differences Encountered in the Classroom and in Gifted Programs. One common description of gifted students is their Overexcitabilities. Drabowski’s Theory, describing this intensity helps practitioners more clearly understand the nature of gifted students and adults. Often those behaviors disrupt learning in the classroom.

Twice exceptional students are unique. No two are alike. Ongoing attention to their cognitive and affective needs is an ongoing demand. For some, social skills mastery will be critical. small groups of 2E students, grouped for those skills, might be considered.

Opposition to this Legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 positively responds to the Differences Encountered in the Classroom and in Gifted Programs. One of the expectations of this legislation is to address the cognitive skills of this legislation through the advanced thinking skills. Another expectation of this legislation is to address the social emotional (SEL) needs of all students, as well. Given the nature of some gifted students with these intensities, ongoing proactive counseling might be imbedded in the day-to-day experiences of these students. On-going proactive counseling with all students should also be considered. Research evidence suggests consistent and supportive attention to the SEL needs of all students pays off in growth of student achievement.

Opposition to this Legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 positively responds to the Differences Encountered in the Classroom and in Gifted Programs. One of the expectations of this legislation is to address the cognitive skills of this legislation through the advanced thinking skills. Another expectation of this legislation is to address the social emotional (SEL) needs of all students, as well. Given the nature of some gifted students with these intensities, ongoing proactive counseling might be imbedded in the day-to-day experiences of these students. On-going proactive counseling with all students should also be considered. Research evidence suggests consistent and supportive attention to the SEL needs of all students pays off in growth of student achievement.

 Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530.   IL and PBL, when taught with fidelity, include both strength based learning strategies and choice in learning.  Both motivate students to learn and engage them in learning. Those experiences are student centered and personalize learning. 

 Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530.   This legislation personalizes learning, narrows the achievement gap, moves Minnesota towards a World Class education system, offers a solution to the economic challenges Minnesota is facing, prepares students for the changing world. 

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530.   Who would oppose this legislation?  There are some legislators not willing to grasp the impact of the research that supports this legislation. There are some MSBA members not willing to understand the research supporting this legislation.

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530.  While not all legislators on the education committees are former teachers or researchers, there still exists an obligation for these legislators to understand the research that supports teaching these advanced thinking skills of the legislation. 

 Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530.  Why would the MDE be opposed to this legislation when as most are educators know the research that supports the legislation and know how its impact on the Achievement Gap.  We could see most of our students succeeding.

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530.  A year ago this past spring, in a hearing in the MN House, experts testified about the challenges facing Minnesota, the changing demographics, the stubborn achievement gap and an opportunity for a constitutional change in how we educate our students.  Out of that meeting the legislature directed the MDE to start keeping track of funding, asking districts to report how their state aid was being spent.

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. Out of that meeting the legislature directed the MDE to start keeping track of funding, asking districts to report how their state aid was being spent.

 Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530.  It appears the legislature had read the Star Tribunes investigative report providing evidence of a $600M, multi-year failure to report on how that money was spent or its impact.  So the new rule stirred the districts.

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530.  So MSBA and MASA, long time supporters of, local control”, determined that losing that option did not align with their goals, so they worked with MDE to create the School Finance Working Group”. 

 Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530.   After a year of on line meetings they concluded with recommendations for removing categorical funding for gifted programming and maintaining local control.

 Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530.   Despite having met with us, and having been provided all the literature and research that supports our arguments, MASA and MDE have stood against this legislative initiative. Yet MASA had no argument with us.

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530.  Yet, when we meet face to face with superintendents, their response is one of, Is it funded?” We responded with an affirmative and they have agreed.  When we laid out our argument is a brief radio interview, the superintendent, who had in his possession documents summarizing research supporting the HF 1994 and SF 1700 and the clones, he agreed with our legislative proposal.

 Opposition to this legislation HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. When we approached both MSBA and EDMN, neither lobbyist was interested in knowing about the research that supports our argument in HF 1994 and SF 1700 and its clones, they are simply worried about the $. If that was their only concern, we know now know it is not the money because the current Education Omnibus bill for 2021-2022 is an improvement over the last years. 

 Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530.  No matter who we address, no matter what we offer, our challengers cannot find fault with the research that guides our efforts. MSBA and their supporters just do not want to be told what to do nor to be held accountable.  In systemic change those tired and obstructionist behaviors are behind us now as we move forward into the 21st Century.  It is in our collective, enlightened self-interest to embrace this legislation.

 Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530.   Please remember the implementation plan.  In the first year, districts receive half of the increased funding for gifted programming. With those dollars districts can examine what they are doing well that fits with this systemic change and prepare their staff to teach all students those advanced skills. 

 Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530.  In the second year of funding, $39 PPU goes to schools. In that second year and every year there after, the funding remains the same until we find it is insufficient. Because it could be three years until we begin seeing the full benefits, district wide, of this systemic change, funding needs to be monitored and assessed to determine its benefits. 

 Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. There exists an accountability element in the legislation: Texas with its 5.5M students have an accountability system and recently invoked a new expectation, requiring all districts to give up it Local Control”, in part because districts were not spending the gifted dollars as intended.

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530.  This legislation would challenge current practice of Local Control”. Districts would be expected to fund gifted programs, fund defensible identification and provide the ongoing professional development focused on all teachers to prepare them to effectively teach teachers these advanced thinking skills and expect them to build them into their teaching.

HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 addresses issues surrounding home ownership in the Twin Cities. Currently a little more than a fifth of Black households own their own home, while home ownership by whites is nearly at 75%.  Unless there are policies intended to encourage people of color and low and moderate income people into home ownership, investors will continue to buy up property. 

HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530, once implemented into law would better prepare graduating students for the changing workplace, trade school or college.  Better preparation in this changing economy results in higher levels of income for all families and home ownership follows.

 HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530, once implemented will have accountability. The CogAT measures growth in critical and creative thinking and provides teachers information about studentsstrengths and weakness.  When strengths are better known, different instructional strategies will be taught by teachers.

HF 1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530, once implemented changes the dynamics for the classroom.  Teachers become facilitators and teaching and learning is student centered.  Paying attention to studentsstrengths and choices, teacher/facilitators take what students are learning and make it fit the system. In a standards based classroom, students are learning differently and are meeting standards at different levels of mastery.  Teacher/facilitators are keeping track of what is being mastered.

 HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 is a response to the challenge districts face with diminished funding: gifted programs are cut or replaced by Talent Development Programs.  Those programs are emerging around the state.  The current $13 PPU is insufficient to support a viable gifted program, in some districts.

HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 responds to the challenge and would expect all districts in the state to have viable gifted programs. Gifted students and all students would be engaged in appropriate learning, districts would not have to seek funding from other sources, and parents of gifted students would not have to travel outside their home district for those programs.

 Equity, Equality, Education and the Economy.  HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 address issues facing the economic future of Minnesota. The New York Times recent article suggests that the pandemic has created challenges in those industries tied to service, which typically are low paying.  An increase in automation, especially in service industries, may prove to be an economic legacy of the pandemic.

 Equity, Equality, Education and the Economy.  HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 address issues facing the economic future of Minnesota Businesses from factories to fast-food outlets to hotels turned to technology last year to keep operations running amid social distancing requirements and contagion fears. Now the outbreak is ebbing in the United States, but the difficulty in hiring workers — at least at the wages that employers are used to paying — is providing new momentum for automation.

179. Equity, Equality, Education and the Economy.  HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 address issues facing the economic future of Minnesota. Technological investments that were made in response to the crisis may contribute to a post-pandemic productivity boom, allowing for higher wages and faster growth. But some economists say the latest wave of automation could eliminate jobs and erode bargaining power, particularly for the lowest-paid workers, in a lasting way. “Once a job is automated, it’s pretty hard to turn back,” said Casey Warman, an economist at Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia who has studied automation in the pandemic.

 Equity, Equality, Education and the Economy.  HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 address the trend toward automation predates the pandemic, but it has accelerated at what is proving to be a critical moment. The rapid reopening of the economy has led to a surge in demand for waiters, hotel maids, retail sales clerks and other workers in service industries that had cut their staffs. At the same time, government benefits have allowed many people to be selective in the jobs they take. 

Equity, Equality, Education and the Economy.  HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 address Automation threatens to tip the advantage back toward employers, potentially eroding those gains. A working paper published by the International Monetary Fund this year predicted that pandemic-induced automation would increase inequality in coming years, not just in the United States but around the world.

HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530, once implemented, expects all students, K-12, to be taught the Advanced Thinking Skill of this legislation. This legislation will also expect all districts to have viable gifted programs.  Currently only about 10% of all 311 school district in Minnesota have defensible gifted programs, yet have been receiving $13 for each student per year in those districts for the past 15 years.  This legislation will have an accountability expectation. 

 Impacting the Teaching Gifted Students Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. All teachers will be impacted.  But accommodations in the implementation will be in place. In the first year of implementation with funding at the $26PPU, teachers will be provided professional development opportunities focused on the nature and needs of gifted students, addressing both the cognitive and affective of these students.

 Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530, would result in less time spent test preparation and practice to prepare for the CogAT testing taken each year.  Remember that it would be measuring growth in critical and creative thinking, a core skill of Inquiry Learning and PBL.

 Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 responds to a request from former Governor Mark Dayton, in 2015, suggesting a reduction in testing and test preparation. Once implement our students would be practicing those core skills of critical and creative thinking on a daily basis as they complete their inquiries and solve their problems.

 Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530, will have a ongoing impact on state revenue.  A workforce with ample practice in Inquiry Learning, Problem Based Learning, Critical Thinking, Creative Thinking and How to Work Collaboratively, during the first four years of this legislation existence, will produce graduates ready for the changing workplace or trade school or college. Those students and those that follow will be on pathways for a life time of higher wage earning resulting in more families of color owning homes, more disabled students prepared for a similar pathway, and will join in the contribution to a healthier and more equitable Minnesota.

 Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530, One or two measures taken yearly with the CogAT should satisfy those who believe in the value of ongoing assessment while satisfy those critics who believe students should be learning on a daily basis rather than preparing to take the MCA.

 Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 provides opportunities for our students to engage in complex and deep learning through Inquiry Learning.  All disciplines courses provide a platform for inquiry. 

 HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 does offers a solution to districts who have the well prepared staff.  In that first year of funding, employ that time to find out what your staff is already doing to match the intent of the legislation and fill in the gaps with PD that prepares all teachers.  Then keep it up each year as staff changes occur and more teachers are being hired.

 Impacting the Teaching Gifted Students Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. That PD will include practice with the advanced thinking skills of this initiative. Teachers will be expected to enhance their teaching and learning to include those advanced skills in all disciplines. 

Impacting the Teaching Gifted Students Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 Impact of this Legislation on Those Professionals Who Work Most Closely With All Students.  While this legislation will impact all students, including the gifted, those professionals working most closely will have different responsibilities in response to the rule. 

 Impacting the Teaching Gifted Students Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. Teachers of the gifted have been studied. Participants included 63 teachers and 1,247 highly able students. The majority of teachers reported holding advanced degrees in a content area; most were not certified to teach and reported completing no formal coursework in gifted education.

Impacting the Teaching Gifted Students Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. Impacting the Teaching Gifted Students Results from the MBTI indicated that exemplary teachers were more likely to prefer N (intuition) and T (thinking), as compared to a normative teacher sample. Results suggest that teacher personality and cognitive style may play a role in his or her effectiveness in teaching gifted students.

 Impact of this Legislation:  Impacting the Teaching Gifted Students Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. The personality types of teachers were in many ways similar to the personality types of the gifted students. These findings suggest that teachers who are judged to be highly effective in working with gifted students prefer abstract themes and concepts, are open and flexible, and value logical analysis and objectivity.

 Impacting the Teaching: Gifted Students Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700 and its clones. Impacting the Teaching of Gifted Students. Teachers in the regular classroom will need practice in differentiating the content, the processes, and products they ask students to engage in learning.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700 and its clones begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota.  The 2020 census reports people of color are making up a greater share of populations in every county in the state, partly due to births and migration, but also because of a declining white non-Hispanic population. For example, people of color now make up about 5% of the population in Lincoln County in southwestern Minnesota, up from 2% at the last census. A closer look shows that the county has about 125 more people of color than it did in 2010 and 380 fewer people who identify as white non-Hispanic.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700and its clones begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota. In the seven-county metro area, the under-18 population is closing in on becoming “majority minority.” About 46% of that group identify as either Hispanic or a race other than white. That’s also significantly higher than the adult population, which is at 27% nonwhite. Young school age people in the rest of Minnesota are also more likely to be people of color than the adults around them, but the rates are much lower.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700 and its clones, Equity, Equality, once implemented, begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota.  The 2020 census reports people of color are making up a greater share of populations in every county in the state, partly due to births and migration, but also because of a declining white non-Hispanic population. For example, people of color now make up about 5% of the population in Lincoln County in southwestern Minnesota, up from 2% at the last census. A closer look shows that the county has about 125 more people of color than it did in 2010 and 380 fewer people who identify as white non-Hispanic begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota. Across the nation the growth stagnation of the nations youth population would be even more severe were it not for the contributions of people of color. Because immigrants and their U.S.-born children, together, are younger than the rest of the population, recent decadesimmigration from Latin America, Asia, and elsewhere served to bolster the size of the nations youth population. This is evident in the contributions of different race-ethnic groups over the 2010-to-2020 period, which shows that Latino or Hispanic youth, Asian American youth, and youth identifying with two are more races contributed to all of this age groups population gains.

 Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700 and its clones, begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota. In Minnesota, almost half of our labor force growth in the past decade came from immigrants, which means the new workers of today look a lot different from a generation ago. Yet in many cases, we have struggled to train and integrate immigrants effectively into our economy, leading to pervasive income gaps that stifle growth. That has to change. According to the Star Tribune, (16/2021), This inequality, between racial groups and between the rich and poor, has been simmering for a long time in America. Economists show that weve experienced the greatest increase in income inequality of any rich nation in the past several decades. According to the Economic Policy Institute, from 1978 to 2018 CEO compensation grew 940% adjusted for inflation, but just 12% for the typical worker.

 Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and its clones begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota. Working people simply dont get paid enough to support their families. In fact, 80% of the open jobs in Minnesota today pay less than the average state wage, and 37% of them pay under $15 an hour. Combine that with fears over in-person work due to the pandemic and major shortages in childcare, and is it any wonder that job-seekers are being a bit picky about what they do next?

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700 and its clones begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota. If Minnesota is going to address our labor shortage in a meaningful way, we need to be aggressive in adapting to these dynamics. If Minnesota is going to address our labor shortage in a meaningful way, we need to be aggressive in adapting to these dynamics. First, we have to make our economy work for today’s worker. That means employers need to rethink their compensation and benefits packages, and their hiring strategies. Since Minnesota-based Punch Pizza announced a $15 hourly wage in April, CEO John Puckett told me he has seen applications for hourly positions jump 500%. Red Wing Shoes’ innovative new “Hyflex” program allows workers to choose any four-hour block they are available to work during the week, based on their schedules. And Jennie-O Turkey Store pooled investments with other organizations to build a child-care center for workers in Spicer.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700 and its clones begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota. Of course, telling a small business with thin profit margins to raise wages or increase benefits is hard. But most employers will tell you they have no choice, and the market is already absorbing some of the higher prices that can come with it. Government needs to help. The Department of Employment and Economic Development’s (DEED) Good Jobs Now campaign calls job seekers every week, pointing out open jobs with good wages and benefits along with training opportunities. This legislation will prepare all students for these higher paying jobs.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700 and its clones begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota. Second, to address our labor shortage Minnesota must invest more in automation. Not only does automation increase productivity, but it also provides opportunity for higher skilled positions that pay more. Automation accelerated during the pandemic. Orders for robots in North America increased 20% in the first three months of 2021, according to the Association for Advancing Automation. This legislation, with the next four years will produce high school graduates with a much different preparation

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700and its clones begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota. Some districts are already faced with dramatic changes in the student population. Worthington Public School, with second generation Hispanic or Latino now in their schools, the district’s population continues to change, with over 59% of the student population, Hispanic or Latino and 6.8% black or African-American, while 21% of the students are white. They are not alone.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700 and its clones begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota. St. Paul, with its influx of Asian, Latino and Black or African-American representing almost 86% of their student population, represents a similar challenge. Education and economics are closely related and as this population graduates they will become contributing participants in the state’s economic with higher paying jobs.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 begins to immediately transforms teaching and learning that is personalized, student centered, competency based, learning does not just take place in schools and students take ownership of their learning. Students will be engaged and motivated to learning when teachers as facilitators, tap students strengths and provide choice in learning.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 addresses both creative and critical thinking skills. Taught independently or within PBL or Inquiry Learning, students will be practicing those important advanced thinking skills and there is a positive impact on academic achievement.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 addresses the teaching of creative thinking strategies throughout a student’s experiences in school. Research, a meta-analysis of 120 studies (total N = 52,578; 782 effects) examining the relationship between creativity and academic achievement in research conducted since the 1960s. Average correlation between creativity and academic achievement was r = .22, 95%. In another study, researchers investigated relationship between students’ creativity and academic achievement. The sample size of 72 subjects was conducted to collect data from the student questionnaire and Torrence’s creativity were used. Field of information gleaned from questionnaires and were analyzed by using both descriptive and inferential statistics. These results are captured components of creativity and achievement, and there were positive significant relationships. The Relationship Between Creativity And Academic Achievement Yaghoob Namia, Hossein Marsooli b, Maral Ashouri.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 begins to immediately transforms teaching and learning that is personalized. Students engaged in Inquiry Learning and Problem based learning will have ample experience employing critical and creative thinking strategies, while often working collaboratively with their fellow students.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota. Minneapolis public school is experiencing a different balance of demographics in their school.With 55% of their student population, students of color, face similar challenges. Yet this legislation’s advanced thinking skills will prepare all 33,000 students for the changing work world and set them on a pathway to college or trade schools.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota. Anoka-Hennepin Public schools with its 38,000 students face a different challenge with 62% of their population are white students. These students will all be challenged and engaged in the learning when all teachers are teaching the Advanced Thinking Skills of this legislation.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 begins to immediately respond to the changing demographics of Minnesota. In that response teacher/facilitators will be introducing these new skills signaling a change in the teaching and learning going on in those classrooms. Will all students embrace this innovative approach initially. Like all new learning some students will thrive and surpass your expectations. Some students, like learning to ride a bike, will need multiple attempts to master this innovate approach.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 addresses the needs of all students, K-12, including the gifted. Scholars agree there are challenges to including all students in the identification practices for screening culturally and linguistically diverse students, disabled students, students of color and those from lower Income households for gifted programming. There is an element of this legislation that expects school districts to include Universal Screening as that inclusive practice. It goes beyond the traditional IQ test and looks at other ways to identify talent.  Consider a portfolio of student work, snapshots of performances, products created by students, all provide a clearer picture of student potential.

 Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 addresses the needs of all students, K-12, including the gifted. Universal screening does open doors for many students often overlooked.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 addresses the advanced thinking skills of this legislation. Inquiry Learning, a learning skill that addresses complexity and depth in learning can be taught to all students.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 provides kindergarten teachers opportunities to introduce inquiry learning to their students and provide the guidance the initial guidance needed to successfully pursue the question, “What happened on the day I was born?” Those 5 year olds would be learning about themselves, their family members and get their first understanding of expert voices that are needed for an inquiry.  

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 opens opportunities for teacher facilitators to engage kindergarten students in rich learning. Maria Montessori, once said, “The goal of early childhood education should be to activate the child’s natural desire to learn.” A kindergartener is on a constance journey to understand their world.  That natural curiosity can be nurtured and satisfied through inquiry learning.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 opens opportunities for all students to find success in learning. The Advanced Thinking Skills of this legislation, when taught with fidelity, will narrow the achievement gap. Research, grounded in Effect Size studies (ES), coupled with a meta-analysis provides evidence of academic growth on achievement measures. An ES greater than .1 suggests 0.2 – 0.4 is a small but educationally significant impact, 0.4 – 0.6 is a medium educationally significant impact and greater than 0.6 is large.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 opens opportunities for all students to find success in learning. Teacher/Facilitators in a classroom rich in inquiry experiences listen to students, seek out their student’s strengths and serve as a guide for the student.

The Advanced Thinking Skills of this legislation, HF 1994 and SF 1700 SF 2523, SF 2530 2408, include Inquiry Learning Strategies. When used in place of a textbook approach, an inquiry-based approach yielded significantly higher achievement for high school students with special needs. Twenty-six junior high school students with learning disabilities studied two science units via an activity-based, inquiry-oriented approach or a textbook approach. Pre- and post-tests revealed that when students were taught by experiential, more indirect methods, they learned more and remembered more than they were taught by more direct instructional methods. When inquirers present their findings to a student audience all students in the classroom are learning.

The Advanced Thinking Skills of this legislation, HF 1994 and SF 1700 SF 2523, SF 2530 2408, include Inquiry Learning Strategies. The research also revealed that hands-on science activities were greatly favored over textbook activities by students who had experienced both.

The Advanced Thinking Skills of this legislation, HF 1994 and SF 1700 SF 2523, SF 2530 2408, include Inquiry Learning Strategies Students were asked about their impressions of the two instructional methods. 96% reported that they enjoyed the inquiry approach more, and over 80% considered the activities more facilitative of learning and more motivating. Scruggs, T. E. and M.A. Mastropieri. 1993. Reading versus doing: The relative effects of textbook based and inquiry-oriented approaches to science learning in special education classrooms. Journal of Special Education 27 (1): 1-15.

The Advanced Thinking Skills of this legislation, HF 1994 and SF 1700 SF 2523, SF 2530 2408, impact student achievement. An inquiry-based curriculum can increase student achievement and narrow the gap between high- and low-achieving students. Middle school teachers who used an inquiry approach increased the achievement scores of African American students, narrowed the achievement gap between male and female students, and found that their students were more interested in what they had to teach. Kahle, J. B., J. Meece, and K. Scantlebury. 2000. Urban African-American middle school science students: Does standards-based teaching make a difference? Journal of Research in Science Teaching 37 (9):1019-1041.

The Advanced Thinking Skills of this legislation, HF 1994 and SF 1700 SF 2523, SF 2530 2408, impact student achievement.Problem Based Learning (PBL), closely related to Inquiry Learning, provides another pathway in learning that engages students and taps their strengths.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 provides teachers opportunities to support PBL with their students.  Problems identified in the community through their high school coursework.  Social issues, Infrastructure challenges, housing, healthcare, peer relationship issues, political issues could all be explored through PBL.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 provides teachers opportunities to support PBL with their students. American businesses need an educated workforce to successfully fill 21st-century STEM jobs, yet 38% of CEOs say at least half of their entry-level applicants lack basic STEM skills. As educators, we must prepare our students for the jobs of the future. We need to ensure that students have the knowledge and skills they need to succeed. Project-based learning (PBL) supports 21st-century student-learning outcomes. Research shows that students who learn through PBL are often more engaged in the learning process and develop a deeper understanding of the content and skills required for college, work, and life beyond school.. Preparing Today’s Students for the Jobs ofTomorrow. Education Week Spotlight, 2018.

 Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 provides teachers opportunities to support PBL with their students In a meta-analysis of 82 observational studies comparing PBL to other instructional approaches, Walker and Leary (2009) found PBL was most strongly associated with student gains in strategic thinking and designing solutions to complex challenges. A synthesis of eight meta-studies of observational studies from the past four decades showed transmission instructional approaches lagged behind PBL in the areas of students’ long-term retention and skill development, as well as satisfaction among both teachers and students. Transmission approaches were, on average, more effective for short-term retention, as measured through standardized exams (Strobel and van Barneveld, 2009). However, causal conclusions are difficult to draw from observational studies because teachers who choose to teach using a PBL approach may differ from those who do not—and those differences, rather than the PBL approach, may drive observed associations between students’ exposure to PBL and their outcomes.

Equity, Equality, and Economics. Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 provides teachers opportunities to support PBL with their students. PBL can be conducted as group investigations or individual efforts.  Partners working together also draw students into the learning. Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 provides teachers opportunities to support PBL with their students.PBL is both collaborative and engaging for students as the teacher facilitator guides the learning.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 begins to respond to impending challenges will face technology The technology, media and telecom industry, which the United States currently leads, could lose out on $162 billion in unrealized output by 2030 due to sector skills shortages. As the researchers put it, “These talent deficits may imperil America’s status as the global tech center.”

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 begins to respond to impending challenges facing not only Minnesota but the nation. “In the United States, according to the report, the skills deficit will be come to the forefront by 2020 and become “significant” by the year 2030. The financial and business services sector, which makes up a disproportionate amount of the American economy, will suffer the worst by then, experiencing a talent shortage expected to exceed 1.2 million workers and generating a shortfall of an estimated $436 billion.

Equity, Equality, and Economics.  Once implemented, HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 begins to respond to impending challenges facing not only Minnesota but the nation. “Our study reveals that there already isn’t enough skilled talent to go around, and, by 2030, organizations and economies could find themselves in the grip of a talent crisis. In the face of such acute talent shortages, workforce planning and a comprehensive understanding of the talent pipeline are critical,” said Korn Ferry CEO, Alan Guarino, in a prepared statement. “The acute demand for workers with the right skills that businesses need, rather than the much-discussed domination of technology in business, could become the defining issue of our age.” This legislation is a solution to this challenge.

Equity, Equality and the Economics of Health Care, HF 1994, SR 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530, will all impact Minnesota’s Healthcare Challenges. JAMA, reports it has published more than 850 articles on racial and ethnic disparities and inequities. The new issue offers studies on disparities in the utilization of health care services and in overall health spending. Together, the findings paint a portrait of a nation still plagued by medical haves and have-nots whose ability to benefit from scientific advances varies by race and ethnicity, despite the fact that the ACA greatly expanded insurance. Minnesota is no different.

Equity, Equality and the Economics of Health Care, HF 1994, SR 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530, will all impact Minnesota’s Healthcare Challenges. JAMA goes on “… we call for investments to create “communities of opportunity”. We use this term to describe the transformation of local communities (that had been historically disadvantaged because of racism and its related systematic under-investments), into places that provide opportunities in education, labor markets, housing markets, credit markets, health care and all other domains that drive well-being. We view the underlying existing inequities as products of racism and the creation of communities of opportunity as a systematic, comprehensive and coordinated national initiative to eliminate the racism that is embedded in policies, procedures and the routine operation of many societal institutions. Improving health of disadvantaged groups and reducing gaps in health requires changing systems to improve conditions that determine health in homes, schools, neighborhoods, workplaces, houses of worship and other social contexts.” A call for systemic change in the way we educate our students by teaching them the advanced thinking skills of this legislation will pay off in dividends.

Equity, Equality and the Economics of Health Care, HF 1994, SR 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530, will all impact Minnesota’s Healthcare Challenges. While numerous statistics point to a stark achievement gap (arguably fueled by an opportunity gap), Senior Director, AAMC Dr. Norma Poll-Hunter rejects the notion that the students are somehow less able. “It’s not the students that are the problem – not the young Black boys or young men. It’s the system and how the system treats them along the way.” Indeed, Dr. Nivet also cites George W. Bush’s phrase “the soft bigotry of low expectations” as a major factor that starts as early as kindergarten and continues through their academic career. Dr. Poll-Hunter adds “The systemic issues build on each other over time and create a disadvantage that even the best students can’t overcome because the reality is that the system has embedded within it these biases that often determine what talent looks like and where talent should come from.” This legislation begins to impact students, K-12, from the first year of implementation.

Equity, Equality and the Economics of Health Care, HF 1994, SR 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530, will all impact Minnesota’s Healthcare Challenges. One challenge, the near absence of Black Male Doctor has been addressed by the AMA.“While the numbers for African Americans are dismal overall, for Black men they’re particularly tragic. Indeed, AAMC’s data shows that the percentage enrollment for African American women actually increased from only 2.2% during the 1978-79 school year to 4.4% during the 2019-20 school year (5.2% when considering those identifying as Black and another race). This begs the question – over the past forty+ years, why haven’t the numbers gotten significantly better for Black men?”

Equity, Equality and the Economics of Health Care, HF 1994, SR 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530, will all impact Minnesota’s Healthcare Challenges. While some may push back on the concept of systemic racism – instead preferring to see inequities as one off aberrations or a result of individual failings – the dearth of Black male doctors in America is arguably a great example of the predictable results of systemic, widespread racism. Arguably, the specific root cause factors are many – all tinged by the reality of racism’s grip on many facets of society including inequities in education, household income, the judicial system, community resources, and many other factors.This legislation with its focus on preparing all students, regardless of color, with the advanced thinking skills needed in our collective future in Minnesota.

Equity, Equality and the Economics is addressed in this legislation.HF 1994, SR 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530, will all impact Minnesota’s students differently.This legislation is call for systemic change in the way we educate our students.  The current model of teaching and learning places the teacher at its center.  In the model emerging from this legislation places the students at the center of learning.  Sir Robertson suggests that this is a paradigm shift. Label It systemic change or paradigm shift, our students will be engaged differently. 

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. When faced with the rationale included in this legislation and providing evidence of personalized learning, as supported by MSBA, and recognizing that the advanced skills of this legislation would narrow the achievement, you would expect the leadership of MSBA to embrace the legislation. 

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530. Instead, MSBA decided to pursue an effort to cancel any attempts at a Mandate.  It was also a failure in not recognizing this legislative initiative is a Call for Systemic Change in the teaching and learning that takes place in our schools.   Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530, this legislation once implemented provides expectations that all students would be taught the advanced thinking skills, supporting the MSBA and MASA long term initiative for personalizing learning

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 offers solution to the challenge of closing the achievement gap and brings Personalized Learning to all classrooms in the state. Yet, despite receiving a 2.4% increase in the first year and an additional 2% in the second year, district leadership and MSBA leaders celebrated the wiping out of any accountability through mandates, effectively announcing that they did not want district to be accountable for how those dollars were to be spent.  It appears some agency should be watching.  They do have a poor track record from the recent past. 

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 an alternative to that opposition. Equity in education has two dimensions. The first is fairness, which basically means making sure that personal and social circumstances – for example school district location, gender, socio-economic status or ethnic origin – should not be an obstacle to achieving educational potential. This legislation addresses equity. 

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 an alternative to that opposition. Education plays an important role in determining how you spend your adult life – a higher level of education means higher earnings, better health, and a longer life. By the same token, the long-term social and financial costs of educational failure are high. So an equitable and inclusive educational system that makes the advantages of education available to all is one of the most powerful levers to make Minnesota schools more equitable.

Fifty-years after the Marland Act, private enterprise has taken the lead in space exploration.  That initial interest and funding established gifted education in Minnesota and our narrowly selected group students were provided a different education in gifted programs that were launched in the 1970’s. We were preparing students to go into their careers prepared to assist in the rapidly changing workplace. With our rapidly changing demographics in Minnesota and the accelerated change in the workplace in our near future, our current students need a different preparation.  The Advanced thinking skills of this legislation will provide that needed training. 

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 offers solution to the challenge of the inequities that exist in healthcare, social services, in access to quality and challenging education, in home owning and the ability to pass on wealth to generations that follow. This legislation addresses the environmental challenges facing Minnesota by producing an educated population prepared with advanced thinking skills to reason out current and future challenges to the air, water and land we all share.  

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 offers solution to the challenge of the inequities that exist in our schools.  It would result in eliminating the opportunity gap and promoting success from birth to career pathways enhanced by the mastery of the Advanced Thinking Skills. 

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 offers solution to the challenge The basic structure of education systems affects equity. Traditionally, education systems have sorted students according to attainment. Evidence from studies of secondary and primary schools suggests that such sorting can increase inequalities and inequities, particularly if it takes place early in the education process. This legislation, once implemented would open opportunities early for K-12 students to experience practicing the Advanced Thinking Skills, including IL and PBL. 

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 offers solution to the challenge. The socio-economic structure of Minnesota’s education teaching and learning is also important. Secondary school systems where there are large socio-economic differences between schools tend to not equalize educational opportunities for all students and where you live impacts your opportunity to learn. 

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 offers solution to the challenge: In a recent report from NWEA research suggests on average, “students across most grades (3-8) made reading and math gains in 2020-21. However, students’ outcomes during the pandemic-affected school year were lower on multiple dimensions: Students made gains during the 2020-21 school year at a lower rate compared to pre- pandemic trends, especially between winter and spring. Students ended the year with lower achievement compared to a typical year, with larger declines relative to historical trends in math (8 to 12 percentile points) than in reading (3 to 6 percentile points). Achievement was lower for all student groups in 2020-21; however American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN), Black, and Latinx students, as well as students in high-poverty schools were disproportionately impacted, particularly in the elementary grades we studied”. Remember in the initial year of implementation, districts will receive half ($26 PPU) of the funding increase to prepare for full implementation ($39 PPU) in the following year.  Professional development will be part of that preparation.  

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 offers solution to the challenge. Inquiry Learning and Problem based learning, rich in practice with critical thinking and creative thinking skills are student centered learning.  The teacher/facilitator is the master of standards.  The learning is student centered.  Students practicing their inquiry and problem based learning experiences, are reading more content. In their presentations the student audience is learning more and reading more.  Teacher/facilitators are recording standards met on the students’ journeys. Payoff is growth in academic achievement for all students. 

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 offers solution to the challenge from those unhappy with the label, Gifted.  The term, Gifted, is a social construct that gains meaning in context.  When NAGC voices its opinion, they reference the term. When Minnesota embrace the funding and programming that began gifted education in the state, Gifted, was employed. School district had Gifted and Talented programs in those initial years, while some districts opted the High Potential Program.  Thinking that language would meet less resistance.  Emerging scholars in the late 70’s a tested the waters with labels that more clearly identified specific areas of giftedness, mathematically gifted, artistically gifted, linguistically gifted, spatially gifted, musically gifted.  It appeared to be more appropriate. Later Gifted Services emerged across that state as an accepted label for programming. It was more inclusive in nature and that label spread.  Later, as Gifted Programs began disappearing across the metro area, as well as, greater Minnesota, a few districts opted for the Talent Development Model that for many gifted students it was no programming at all.  Many districts simply chose to have no gifted program, at all.  

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 positively responds to the call from the National School Boards Association report on equity (2106). “Public schools should provide equitable access and ensure that all students have the knowledge and skills to succeed as contributing members of a rapidly changing global society regardless of race, gender, sexual orientation, ethnic background, English proficiency, immigration status, socioeconomic status, or disability.” 

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 positively responds to the changing demographics in our state. This legislation includes an expectation to employ Universal Screening as an identification process that tends to be more inclusive identifying more students of color and disabled students.

Opposition to this legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 positively responds to the changing demographics in our state. This legislation includes an expectation to employ Universal Screening as an identification process that tends to be more inclusive identifying more students of color and disabled students.

Inclusive programming for gifted programs would include students of color. The challenge identified in this video points to a common challenge faced by most districts regarding of the lack of Black Male Teachers. Hopefully that condition will change as more efforts by media and state agencies to recruit more adult Black Males to the ranks of teachers in all schools. Universal Screening will be enhanced when identification practices include Black Male teachers. Universal screening with its many tools will become common practice in our schools.

Opposition to this Legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 positively responds to the Differences Encountered In the Classroom and in Gifted Programs. Gifted Students with Disabilities, (2E), are often missed in the identification process in gifted programs. A 2E student’s performance is often masked by the disability. Universal Screening, included in the legislation would be employed and more disabled students would start benefitting from the gifted programs.

Opposition to this Legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 positively responds to the Differences Encountered in the Classroom and in Gifted Programs. One common description of gifted students is their intensity. That intensity may mask the gift that students brings to the classroom that would allow that student to soar academically.

Opposition to this Legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 positively responds to the Differences Encountered in the Classroom and in Gifted Programs. One common description of gifted students is their Overexcitabilities. Drabowski’s Theory, describing this intensity helps practitioners more clearly understand the nature of gifted students and adults. Often those behaviors disrupt learning in the classroom.

Twice exceptional students are unique. No two are alike. Ongoing attention to their cognitive and affective needs is an ongoing demand. For some, social skills mastery will be critical. small groups of 2E students, grouped for those skills, might be considered.

Opposition to this Legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 positively responds to the Differences Encountered in the Classroom and in Gifted Programs. One of the expectations of this legislation is to address the cognitive skills of this legislation through the advanced thinking skills. Another expectation of this legislation is to address the social emotional (SEL) needs of all students, as well. Given the nature of some gifted students with these intensities, ongoing proactive counseling might be imbedded in the day-to-day experiences of these students. On-going proactive counseling with all students should also be considered. Research evidence suggests consistent and supportive attention to the SEL needs of all students pays off in growth of student achievement.

Opposition to this Legislation: HF1994 and SF 1700, SF 2523, SF 2408, SF 2530 positively responds to the Differences Encountered in the Classroom and in Gifted Programs. One of the expectations of this legislation is to address the cognitive skills of this legislation through the advanced thinking skills. Another expectation of this legislation is to address the social emotional (SEL) needs of all students, as well. Given the nature of some gifted students with these intensities, ongoing proactive counseling might be imbedded in the day-to-day experiences of these students. On-going proactive counseling with all students should also be considered. Research evidence suggests consistent and supportive attention to the SEL needs of all students pays off in growth of student achievement.

 

 

 

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